Kona Precept 27.5 Full Suspension

DESCRIPTION

  • Frame Material: Kona 6061 Aluminum Butted 120mm travel
  • Fork: RockShox XC 30 120mm
  • Pedals: Wellgo Platform
  • Chain: Shimano HG53
  • Shifters: Shimano Altus

USER REVIEWS

Showing 1-5 of 5  
[May 04, 2021]


OVERALL
RATING
5
Strength:

Overall the bike is a hard choice if you don't have the money to buy a process or a giant trance. Specially in the countries where the price can be too expensive. But the quality is superb especially for retaining walls drive.

Weakness:

None so far.

[Nov 13, 2017]
Bill Ernst
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
4
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Great value, quality frame, good tires

Weakness:

A little heavy

I’ve owned a Kona Precept for two years. It was value priced compared to many other quality full-suspension bikes. The bike has served me well in remote areas of Alaska. It performs well on our local (Fairbanks) single-track park. I’ve had no mechanical issues to date. It performs comparably to full-suspension bikes that cost more than $2000. I’ve ridden Giant and Specialized FS bikes and find my Precept to be their equal.

Similar Products Used:

SpecIalized, Giant

[Aug 09, 2016]
Todd
Cross Country Rider

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

Quality frame build. Great price for entry into 27.5 FS Trail Bike.

Weakness:

Some spec'd parts could have been better (in-house "no-brand" rear shock, Tektro M290 brakes, 3x9 drivetrain). 32.4lbs out of the box!!!!

Below reviews are obviously for the Precept DL not the "regular" Precept. The regular Precept has lower spec'd components. Decided to jump on the 27.5 FS bandwagon but didn't want to spend $$$$ and end up with a bike I didn't like. Found the Precept Online for a good price and after some research of similar priced bikes I pulled the trigger. But I did have some reservations about the geometry specs and the sizing....later on that.

Bike arrived and I got it put together quickly with no issue out of the box (front derailleur rubs a little in middle chainring and the two largest cogs in back. Not horrible but somewhat annoying). Being new to a "TRAIL" bike I was looking at the 60mm stem and 760mm bars and thinking, NFW!!! My other XC bikes are 120mm stems and 580mm bars, I know, old school! But that's what I'm used to. However, I did have a 90mm stem and 700mm flat bar that I swapped onto the Precept as a compromise.

This is where the geometry/sizing got strange. I ordered a Medium (16.5") size as I normally fall somewhere between small and medium sizes. I figured I'd go with the larger size based on the geometry numbers being very similar to my XC bikes. Once I started to set up the seat position a few issues arose. (1) I could not get the saddle far enough back to match the position relative to the crank as my other bikes. Like, WAY off....! inch off. So I started looking at it and that's when I realized that Kona had put a zero set-back post on the bike. Ok, I can put another post on it....Then I noticed that they also spec'd 170mm crank arms on it!!!!!!! WTF?!?!? So not only is my "position" 25mm to far forward, but my position relative to the pedals is an additional 5mm forward. So I was apprehensive about the first ride.

Well, I've only ridden the bike once so far, and it wasn't as bad as I thought. Actually my position on the bike felt ok except for sitting too far back on the saddle. Other than that the bike felt planted and cornered well. The suspension felt pretty stiff, but I think I had too much air in both the front and rear shocks. Although it did soak up the hits well enough for what type of riding I do.

I did order a set-back seatpost and installed it last night. But it only gained me about 3/8" (9.5mm) more rearward saddle adjustment, so I just have live with it. I'm on the fence about the 170mm crank arm length. It didn't feel much different on the trail, but I noticed some knee pain after the ride. I may swap to 175mm cranks soon.

I was impress with how the bike felt on the trail and hope with some upgrades it will be a great bike. But as it sits now it's extremely heavy (32.4lbs). And it has some weird quirky aspects...E2 frt derailleur mount attached TO the chunky chainstay which is a PIA to get a wrench into to adjust...crank arm length, frt derailleur cable routing undr BB then up through the chainstay, then around the derailleur mech, and then back down throught the chainstay again through another hole.

I plan to take it out again tonight and will see how some of the adjustment I made work. But overall I think the bike will be a decent all-around ride.

Similar Products Used:

TITUS Racer-X, TITUS-X alloy, Intense Tracer 1st gen, Fuji Reveal 2.0, Mountain Cycle SLiX.

[Jan 12, 2014]
Daniel
All Mountain Rider

OVERALL
RATING
5
VALUE
RATING
5
Strength:

Transmission SLX and SLX shadow really efficient, rock shox sektor it's just fine, not exactly a pike, but for the price it's perfect. Overall the bike is a hard choice if you don't have the money to buy a process or a giant trance. Specially in the countries where the price can be too expensive.

Weakness:

It's a good option change the rear suspension for a Monarch RL or RT3, and improve the breaks. But, I insist, it's a killer bike for the price, you can do almost everything, from XC to Enduro and Downhill light.

It's a cheap, ready-to-go bike just for the right price. You can see where the money goes, and after a few minutes riding you can sense the speed and a huge smile on your face.

[Nov 29, 2013]
Kevin LaRoe
Racer

OVERALL
RATING
3
VALUE
RATING
4
Strength:

An under 2000 dollar full suspension 27.5 wheeled bike that handles the trail just fine!!

Weakness:

An under 2000 dollar bike with a "CHEAP" Rockshox rear and rockshox front fork. After being spoiled with there Hei Hei and the Process series I can tell the difference.

I like the bike at the price point!! If you can afford to step up to the Process series do it!!

Similar Products Used:

Process 134, 153, 111 and the Hei Hei Deluxe

MTBR Newsletter

Get the latest mountain bike reviews, news, race results, and much more by signing up for the MTBR Newsletter

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2021 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.